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Hydraulic Filtration Pressure Drop

The Filter Guys

Hydraulic Filtration Pressure Drop

 

The difference between the inlet pressure and the outlet pressure is called pressure drop or differential pressure. It’s symbolized by ∆P. ∆P is an irrecoverable loss of total pressure caused by the filter, and is mostly due to frictional drag on the fibers in the media.

Differential drop drop may increase as the particulate rating or efficiency of the filter (as expressed by its beta ratio) gets better. ∆P also increases as the filter is being loaded with contaminant.

 

Four Major Factors Contribute to Pressure Drop

 

  1. Filter Media.

 

Media is, of course, the main factor influencing pressure drop; indeed, it causes pressure drop. That’s why having a low-friction, high-flowing media is so important. The natural cellulose or paper fibers (shown at left) typically used in filtration are large, rough, and as irregular as nature made them.

Donaldson developed a synthetic media with smooth, rounded fibers, consistently shaped so that we can control the fiber size and distribution pattern throughout the media mat, and still allow the smoothest, least inhibited fluid flow. Our synthetic media is named Synteq™.

Synteq fibers offer the least amount of resistance to fluid passing through the media. Consistency of fiber shape allows the maximum amount of contaminantcatching surface area and specific pore size control. The result is media with predictable filtration efficiencies at removing specified contaminants (i.g., 4 µm) and maximum dirt holding capacity.

Natural cellulose fibers are larger than synthetic fibers and jagged in shape, so controlling size of the pores in the media mat is difficult and there is less open volume. In most applications this results in higher ∆P as compared to synthetic filters. Higher beta ratings mean there are smaller pores in the media; smaller media pores cause more flow resistance, in turn causing higher pressure drop.

 

  1. Dirt.

 

Contaminant As dirt gets caught in the media, it eventually begins to build up and fill the pore openings. As the pore openings shrink, the differential pressure (pressure drop) increases. This is called restriction. This photo from our scanning electron microscope shows actual dirt particles building up in the media pores.

Excessive dirt in the media can cause dirt migration or even filter failure. Dirt migration occurs when the restriction is so great that the differential pressure pushes dirt deeper into the media and, eventually, through the media and back into the system. Filter failure occurs when the restriction becomes so high that the filter cartridge collapses (outside-in flow) or bursts (inside-out flow) to relieve the upstream pressure.

To avoid such catastrophe, use of a filter service indicator is recommended. It measures the pressure drop across the filter, then signals when the filter is ‘full’ and needs to be changed.

 

  1. Flow

 

Higher flows create higher pressure drop. With fast moving fluid, there will be more friction causing higher pressure drop across the media.

 

  1. Fluid Viscosity

 

Measured in centistokes (cSt) or Saybolt Seconds Universal (SSU or SUS), fluid viscosity is the resistance of a fluid to flow. As fluid viscosity increases, the cSt rating increases. Higher fluid viscosities also mean higher pressure drop because the thicker oil has a tougher time passing through the layer of media fibers. Cold start fluid is a good example of highly viscous fluid. See chart below.

Filter media, amount of contamination, the flow rate, and fluid viscosity are all factors in the importance of sizing the filter for the system requirements. Filters that are too small won’t be able to handle the system flow rate and will create excessive pressure drop from the start. The results could be filter operation in the bypass mode, filter failure, component malfunction, or catastrophic system failures. Filters that are too large for the system can be too costly. Oversized filters require more system oil and higher cost replacement filters. Optimal sizing is best.

Don’t Retighten a Lube or Oil Filter Once it has Been Installed.

The Filter Guys

To avoid cross-threading DO NOT OVER TIGHTEN OR RETIGHTEN a filter. Follow These Proper Steps for Installation of Engine Lube Spin-on Filters

The spin-on engine lube filter is a commonly serviced component on your vehicle. To insure normal oil filter service life and to prevent oil leakage or possible internal engine damage, the following procedure should be followed when replacing spin-on engine lube filters.

Before Installation:

  • Unscrew and remove the old filter.
  • Remove the old filter gasket if still attached to the base.
  • Wipe the filter mounting base or head with a clean cloth.

To Install a Spin-on Lube Filter:

1. If manufacturer recommends, fill new filter with oil on the dirty side. Do not pour the oil down the clean oil centre tube.

2. Apply a thin film of clean motor oil to the new filter gasket. Do not use grease.

3. To avoid cross-threading, line up the filter threads to the mounting base/head carefully. Screw the new filter on until the gasket contacts the base.

4. Follow the instructions on the filter for final tightening torque specification. DO NOT OVER TIGHTEN.

5. Check the gasket of the new filter to be sure it is properly seated in the groove.

Note that not all filters require the use of tools for changing.

After Installation:

6. Be sure the oil reaches the full level on the dipstick.

7. Start engine and check for leaks around the oil filter and drain plug. Correct the source of leaks if any are observed.

8. Shut the engine off and recheck the oil level. Add oil if needed.

Always dispose of old oil and used filters responsibly.