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Filters for Generators.

The Filter Guys

The Generator aftermarket in the UK is made up of many hundreds of machines and static equipment that require regular filter servicing to maintain their optimum performance. We can identify and hold large stocks of filters and separators for machines including: Atlas Copco, Cummins, Deutz Fahr, Ingersoll Rand, Volvo Penta, Yanmar, MTU, SDMO and many more.

Regular, scheduled maintenance of your engine and hydraulic circuit filters can avoid breakdowns and lengthy downtime of your machine. Holding a set of filters in stock can also reduce the amount of time that your machine is down when the lead time for replacement filters is more than a few days.

At Sterling Filtration we endeavour to hold as much stock for as many machines as possible. If you have an urgent filter requirement, a breakdown to repair or are just looking for competitively priced filters for stock please give us a call today.

How Filter Media Collects Particles

The Filter Guys

How Filter Media Collects Particles. There are four basic ways media captures particles.

The first, called inertia, works on large, heavy particles suspended in the flow stream. These particles are heavier than the fluid surrounding them. As the fluid changes direction to enter the fiber space, the particle continues in a straight line and collides with the media fibers where it is trapped and held.

The second way media can capture particles is by diffusion. Diffusion works on the smallest particles. Small particles are not held in place by the viscous fluid and diffuse within the flow stream. As the particles traverse the flow stream, they collide with the fiber and are collected.

The third method of particle entrapment is call interception. Direct interception works on particles in the mid-range size that are not quite large enough to have inertia and not small enough to diffuse within the flow stream. These mid-sized particles follow the flow stream as it bends through the fiber spaces. Particles are intercepted or captured when they touch a fiber.

The fourth method of capture is called sieving and is the most common mechanism in hydraulic filtration. As shown at right, this is when the particle is too large to fit between the fiber spaces.